Internet & Related Stuff

For Internet and Related Stuff.

So it's a done deal; I have a new job in Auckland and the family are moving - this week - so i've flown back down (having started work in Auckland a month ago) to help pack up the house and 'finish up' with our Wellington business.

That business includes Laura's last day at Kindergarten (now completed... one of those happy-sad events!!) - Lauras (pre-emptive) 5th birthday party (tomorrow) and then a bout of frantic packing, before the moving company shows up on Monday to pick up our stuff.

Tuesday, road-trip ahoy.. to Auckland via Wellington Airport (our kitties are being flown up).

So yes. Been at work a month and i'm already taking a week off - but with good reason! :-) And i'll be very glad to have the family with me (i've missed them heaps!)

Anyway, about the photo. I follow @flyairnz on Twitter and was fortunate enough to score a limited-edition T-Shirt comemorating Air New Zealand's first flight ("ZK-AMA"). It arrived a few days ago. I figured that my AirNZ flight home to Wellington (likely to be my last flight for a while!) was an ideal opportunity to 'christen' the shirt.

Even more interestingly, I had seat 1D (front row, isle seat) and the Purser had one of those faces that I was sure i'd seen somewhere before. Turns out, I had... on the now famous Body-Painted in-flight safety video. So noting that the AirNZ Twitter folks wanted pics of folks wearing their shirt, it seemed like an obvious many-birds-with-one-stone opportunity.

Geoff was great to talk to and very helpful during the flight, and as usual, AirNZ's service was excellent. Must admit i'm going to miss having semi frequent occaisions to fly with them.

... at least per a Tweet I saw.

http://tinyurl.com/2c22e53 wow how interesting! :-)

Power Pylons, Pipelines, Airfields, Roads... hoards of stuff (havn't had time to touch the surface yet).

Neat!

GoPetition

By all accounts the PublicACTA event held in Wellington on Saturday was a roaring success. Sadly, I was unable to attend, and it sounds like I missed a great event. That said, we now have a bunch of smart folks who've had opportunity to discuss at length the issues that the so-called Anti Counterfeiting Trade Agreement is generating, and to produce the 'Wellington Declaration'. This is to be presented to the Government in less than 2 days - and hopefully made available to the ACTA negotiators.

Everyone who cares about the ongoing rights and freedoms of citizens of NZ - in particular regarding the Internet but also regarding the ways Government creates law - should be paying careful attention to ACTA. If the contents of the declaration ring true with you, show your support and Sign the Petition.

I Plugged it on NZLUG, and AuckLUG as well. It goes a little way toward explaining the background of this, largely ripped directly from the PublicACTA website.

Big Kudos to InternetNZ (hat-tip Jordan Carter), Nat Torkington, Don Christie, Peter Harrison and all of those who've been involved in both PublicACTA and from my personal perspective, the NZOSS's arguments against ACTA - NZOSS have been very proactive in responding to ACTA's potential risk to the FLOSS community and i'm proud to be involved with such upstanding folks.

So yeah, anyway, get signing! And stay tuned, I have no doubt we've in no way heard the end of this.

So I grab the latest Opera browser download from their website and install it.
First website that loads is somewhat entertaining:

What's wrong with this picture?

Oh, and no, i'm not converting from Firefox (yet). I do however need a second browser that isn't IE6, and that means Opera at this point. I pondered Chrome, but... not right now.

I feel almost silly doing this now, but I said I would and i'm sure i'll look back and be glad I did; more entries about LCA2010. This entry covers Wednesday and Thursday.

I was going to blog about this, but Computerworld have all-but done it for me..

I had a recent epiphany as I was reflecting on ACTA, the Anti Counterfeiting Trade Agreement. To want to block counterfeit items - that is, genuine fakes, is admirable and I support it fully.

I'm not sure that piracy - which is illegitimate replicas of an original, sure, but a soft original (such that in essence, there's no difference between the original and the copy, except the media across which it is delivered) is not quite the same. For one, the scale is entirely different (and the above article illustrates this well). For another, you are infact getting 'the real deal' (most of the time). The software (or media) is infact exactly the same, as the original shipped from the factory. The physical media on which it is delivered ceases to be very relevant once it's installed / copied onto disk, for the most part!
Obviously the technical details vary between software, and media (movies/music).

I don't support media piracy either, but ACTA - a Trade Agreement - is not the place to implement totalitarian policies - and to plan this in secret!

Interesting to read recent comments that comment on how the European Union almost unanimously voted to open up ACTA negotiations and not carry them out in secret (with the holdouts, apparently, being the United Kingdom!!) - and simultaneously, Obama vocally supporting the secret approach. So two of the largest 'western' governments appear to be under the thumb of 'rights holders' - aka the big-money media companies.

A Sad Day for the New Zealand Internet.

Initially when the idea of the DIA Internet Filter (targeted specifically at Child Pornography) was floated I didn't have too many problems with it; their method of implementation (BGP against the IP, and then content filter for HTTP only) is pretty low-impact and the risk of collateral damage is about as low as you could reasonably expect.

However recent media coverage notes that several ISPs are against the filter - which has been launched, but only with Maxnet and Watchdog (others pending) - and some of the reasons identified are pretty damn reasonable.

We have a Single-Point-of-Failure - a single Denial of Service target - and a blocklist which is hidden from public view, so we're trusting our friends at the DIA's Censorship Shop to 'get it right' and to never, ever add content that extends beyond the filters mandate.

So the questions then are,
Do we want another SPOF situation, and
Do we trust the government not to extend the scope of the filter?

Australia has had its own dramas with content filtering - but theirs is mandatory, and far more wide-reaching. The NZ one is 'not too bad' but I have to admit sharing the concerns raised by Slingshot, and others.

In the end, the simple answer is the best; The only people responsible for web content are its creators and publishers. The win over child porn would be to identify and lock up / castrate those who create the content in the first place, and those who make it available. If you need to then nab folks, go for the consumers (the ones who create the market in the first place) who're actually the ones guilty of handling objectionable material.

As I posted to Facebook the other day.... :D :D :D

With thanks to the Wellywood Sign Generator. :-)

My LCA2010 Tuesday started with an Airport pickup; it was my job to meet Keith Packard at Wellington International Airport and deliver him to the event.
I then had to drive across town to my car park and walk back to the event :/

However... I did get back on time to pick up the tail of the Keynote and then attend the remainder of the days session - and this day was of particular interest, being the 'Open and the Public Sector' stream. This was kicked off by Don Christie in his role of President of the New Zealand Open Source Society and the keynote was by the UK Governments Director of Digital Engagement, Andrew Stott. I have to say that I give the UK Government a lot of credit for their willingness to embrace online engagement, the talk was given via Skype and was (generally) successful - though they should probably have pumped the audio across an ordinary PSTN or even cellular phoneline, as the Internet link wasn't flawless by any means...

Syndicate content