Internet & Related Stuff

For Internet and Related Stuff.

I got asked to write a blog for the ITP's Techblog.
You can read it on their site, of course (and I encourage this!), but I'm also reproducing it here for posterity (call it a backup copy, hah!).

Been a while since I wrote anything for external publication. I apologise in advance :)

--8<--
NZNOG 2017 - working together for a better internet
Mark Foster, Guest post. 31 January 2017, 7:20 am

The New Zealand Network Operators Group has been holding a conference annually for the last 15 years, and the 2017 edition was held last week at the Trinity Wharf Hotel in Tauranga.

The NZNOG was, like many similar groups, originally established as a mailing list to enable collaboration and coordination between the operators of internet networks across New Zealand, and was the forum through which many of the peering relationships - that is, the links between various ISPs and network operators that today carry the vast majority of domestic internet traffic - were established. The mailing list itself continues to act as a forum for discussing issues of mutual interest, but the annual NZNOG conference is also a big drawcard. It remains one of the few community-led technical conferences in New Zealand, with a reputation for delivering high-grade technical content. Just as valuable. though, is the other kind of networking - the social kind. The network operations community in New Zealand is small, and this is their annual opportunity to establish and build on those all-important inter-personal relationships that help our data move from A to B without drama.

I've had some interesting exchanges with people who've been sending me connect requests of-late. My usual approach - that I will connect with people 'with whom I have done business, or who I know personally' - tends to result in me fending off unsolicited connection requests from a swathe of people who fit into neither category. Of those, one can usually classify the request as being:

  • A recruiter, looking to recruit me for a role
  • A recruiter, looking for a role for a candidate already on the books
  • A recruiter, looking to expand their network in order to potentially action either of the above at some point in the future
  • A jobseeker, looking to make connections in order to find a role for themselves - and these are often offshore candidates (plenty from India, Pakistan, Bangledesh, Sri Lanka and South East Asia in general)
  • A Sales Manager, Account Manager or Business Development Manager looking to draw attention to their latest innovation that they really want to sell you
  • One of the aforementioned three ultimately trying for the same outcome, but being more subtle about it (playing the long game).
  • Someone else from the Industry, engaging their LION (Linked-In Open Networker) - basically expanding their professional network for as-yet-unqualified reasons (but in my experience many LION types are also sales-and-marketing focused at some level.)

All of the above - except perhaps the job-seeker and maybe the LION type - are looking to ultimately make money from me. Thus all of them are, fundamentally, sales or revenue-driven networkers who are playing off the numbers - if even 1% of connections over the course of a day/month/year engage with me for business, it's worth the relatively small mechanical effort to click 'connect'.

I was inspired to Google after (yet again) getting frustrated by inconsistent user experience in Microsoft Outlook.

http://www.codetwo.com/blog/double-spacing-in-outgoing-messages-in-ms-outlook-2007-2010-2013/

Short version; Outlook's trying to act like a professional word processing package when you use 'HTML' format for email creation, and actively using behavior contrary to pretty much every other MUA.
What's new?

I ordinarily enjoy using Outlook as an MUA but it does have a couple of annoying quirks, this is definately one of them. The content of the above link is likely to be useful.

I came across a Reddit Thread recently which included this gem:

From the comments that have been posted on this thread and what I found on the Mozilla forums so far:

1- In a new tab, type or paste about:config in the address bar and press Enter/Return. Click the button promising to be careful.

2- Set browser.newtab.url to about:blank>

3- To disable the callbacks to tiles.cdn.mozilla.com without enabling the "do not track" feature you need to remove the address from browser.newtabpage.directory.ping and browser.newtabpage.directory.source

Source:

https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/questions/1074600

http://forums.mozillazine.org/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=2888321

So i've now done both of the above and feel much better.

The Reddit page linked to a ZDNet.com article talking about Mozilla's new Advertising strategy. I for one don't need a third party tracking what I do when I click on 'new tab' ... ! Interestingly there's also a move to remove browser.newtab.url due to "Abuse" which seems to be in itself, contentious, but it's possible you'll have to use an addon to achieve the above, at least in part, in the near future.

Today at #NetHui I attended a discussion on Disaster Recovery.
Ham radio got a brief mention.
Then later the same day, I get referred to this:

Never underestimate the value that ham radio can bring to communications 'when all else fails'.

If you're a Kiwi you'd have to have been hiding under a rock to have missed the fact that Xtra's email service has been under siege lately.

In February, a significant number of xtra.co.nz email addresses - hosted by Yahoo in Sydney - were compromised. It appears that an organised botnet was able to access the mailboxes of many thousand subscribers, and use those mailboxes to generate spam emails (pointing at malicious web content) to email addresses found in those mailboxes - pulled from address books, sent items or similar.

The root cause has not been publicly announced by Yahoo, as far as I know, but I recall reading about a Cross Site Scripting issue involving Wordpress that sounds plausible in some respects. That said, I know that several of the accounts compromised (including one of mine!) have not been used in a long time - or at least, hadn't been, until this issue came to light... which makes one wonder how long this has been parked, waiting - or whether there is some _other_ vulnerability at work.

Anycase, there was a public outcry, and lots of 'change your password' advice being given out to account holders, and the rest of us got to suffer under a deluge of spam originating from Yahoo's servers - let's make it clear, it's not just the account holders that've suffered here, it's the folks they've corresponded with! - and in the aftermath Telecom had to announce a review of their email arrangement with Yahoo (to whom xtra.co.nz email has been outsourced for some years). NBR has a good article with the background, and their public announcement to stay with Yahoo on the grounds of a promise from Yahoo to 'do better'.

Havn't blogged in a while, but this one has me very motivated.

Solarwinds are a relatively well known IT Management & Monitoring Software company.
Amongst their commercial product suite(s) are free tools that they make available to people who simply have to provide their personal information (name, email address, some other information) so that they can collect information about who's using the tools. Supposedly.

I have personally used their TFTP Server and their Advanced Subnet Calculator at various stages over the last 7 years or so and been fairly happy with them; despite being bannerware they actually do what they advertise and the Subnet Calculator has been very helpful as recently as in the last 12 months. (I run Linux almost exclusively these days, but still flitter in Windows and when i'm there, these tools still feature).

Unfortunately for Solarwinds, they've ever compromised their standards and disclosed their user information publically, or... they've been compromised, and had their user information disclosed publically.

On 6 December 2012 I received a spam email to an address i'd only ever given to Solarwinds.com.

Noting this I engaged with Solarwinds via Twitter, who, to their credit, were prompt in responding and I forwarded a full-headers version to them at their request.

Unfortunately there's been nothing further from them, and today I received yet more Spam. Similar enough I believe it to be from the same crowd.

A quick look on their Facebook page shows i'm not the only one now receiving unsolicited email to an email address that was exclusively given to Solarwinds.com only. Noone else.

So it's time to put it 'out there'. Did you receive the above? To an address disclosed to solarwinds.com ? Surely a company such as Solarwinds must realise how scandalous this sort of thing can be - or is?

Not sure why Xubuntu didn't take a leaf from Ubuntu and make Vino a better integrated tool.. however you can install it, and you can configure it, and use it.
I used instructions from Ehow but the gist is:

# apt-get install vino

followed by

# vino-preferences

followed by creating a new auto-startup entry for

# /usr/lib/vino/vino-server

So knowing that my Ubuntu 10.10 was about to go out of support, I took the plunge and made two calls:

1) Ubuntu's move to Unity was not to my liking, and

2) I'd like to move to the new LTS; 12.04.

So I went to Xubuntu; the Xfce based Ubuntu variant.

Unfortunately, as it's only March 2012, 12.04 is only just into Beta stage. So my installation is Xubuntu 12.04b1 64bit.

First impressions? I like it. However there's been a few odds and sods i've had to deal to manually, and eventually i'll tie them into this blog article.

Browsers
I operate with Firefox as my main browser, and Chrome/Chromium as my second browser, used for mainly work-related things or where i'm testing for browser incompatibilities. Unfortunately Chromium doesn't seem to play well with other browsers, and where Firefox is otherwise configured as the default, this isn't necessarily true...

Anycase this was my fix to make Firefox take all the stuff that Chromium was stealing, in this case links presented via Pidgin IM:

root@hawkeye:/etc/alternatives# rm gnome-www-browser 
root@hawkeye:/etc/alternatives# rm x-www-browser 
root@hawkeye:/etc/alternatives# ln -s /usr/bin/firefox gnome-www-browser
root@hawkeye:/etc/alternatives# ln -s /usr/bin/firefox x-www-browser

More coming soon as I work through the kinks. On the whole i'm pretty damn happy with it so far, including the fact that it's able to run Gnome apps.

The New Zealand Network Operators Group Conference 2012 was held in Christchurch this year, and I was fortunate enough to attend.
The usual conference form is Workshops / Multi-Day tutorials Monday-Tuesday-Wednesday, half or full-day tutorials on the Wednesday, and the conference proper on the Thursday and Friday made up of a series of technical presentations (from 5 minutes to 45 minutes in length) on a variety of topics of interest to Network Operators.

NZNOG is the only event of its type in the NZ ICT calendar and serves as a useful way to keep up with current events, new developments and innovations in the NZ Networking scene.

Of course, there's always the light hearted side of things; Network Geeks are renowned for their beer-drinking prowess and well, NZNOG never fails... the proportion of NOGgers who don't drink do nevertheless get to have a great time.

I have Photos (See http://gallery3.blakjak.net/index.php/Events/2012/NZNOG-2012 and ) Video (see below) ;-)


Syndicate content